Question: Why does the narrator give Maggie the quilts instead of letting Dee take them?

Why does the narrator want Maggie to have quilts instead of Dee?

In the short story, “Everyday Use”, by Alice Walker, why does the narrator want Maggie to have the quilts instead of Dee? A. Maggie helped her grandmother make the quilts, but Dee refused to learn how to make them. … Maggie is marrying someone the narrator approves of, but Dee has married someone of a different religion.

Why should Maggie get the quilts?

When Mama gives the quilts the Maggie, she ensures that the family heritage will stay alive in the manner she prefers. By using the quilts and making her own when they wear out, Maggie will add to the family’s legacy, rather than distancing herself from it.

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Does Mama regret giving Maggie the quilts?

By giving the quilts to Maggie, Mama in a sense merely fulfills her promise. Mama had previously offered Dee a quilt, years earlier, but the offer had been rejected since quilts at that time were out of style. Maggie’s appreciation of the quilts has been long and consistent and will remain so.

Why does Dee want the quilts?

Why does Dee want the quilts? Dee wants the quilts so she can hang them up in her home and remember her heritage. … At the end of the story, the mother “snatched the quilts out of Mrs. Wangero’s hands and dumped them into Maggie’s lap” (8).

What is the relationship between Dee and Maggie?

Mama, protective as she is of Maggie, is frank about her shortcomings and problems. Maggie’s relationship with Dee is rife with jealousy and awe. Mama recalls how Maggie had always thought Dee had been gifted with an easy life in which her hopes and desires were rarely, if ever, frustrated.

What do the quilts signify to Maggie and what do they symbolize to Dee in everyday use?

Quilts. “Everyday Use” focuses on the bonds between women of different generations and their enduring legacy, as symbolized in the quilts they fashion together. This connection between generations is strong, yet Dee’s arrival and lack of understanding of her history shows that those bonds are vulnerable as well.

What does the narrator’s treatment of Maggie reveal about the narrator?

What does the narrator’s treatment of Maggie reveal about the narrator? The narrator values for close family ties with Maggie more than her heritage as defined by Dee.

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What is the difference between Dee and Maggie in Everyday Use?

In Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use,” this is not happened. The only thing Maggie and Dee share in common is the fact that they were both raised by the same woman in the same home. They differ in appearance, personality. Alice carefully portray the draw of the three characters ‘Dee, Mama and Maggie’.

What is the relationship between Dee and Mama in Everyday Use?

Dee can be called the antithesis of Mama: They are opposites in every way. Mama is fat; Dee is thin. Mama is uneducated; Dee has a college degree. Mama loves both of her daughters, but we sense that Mama dislikes Dee; she knows that Dee is embarrassed by her–the way she looks, the way she talks, the way she lives.

How does Dee differ from her mother and Maggie?

Maggie is “homely,” shy, and has scars from her burns. Dee is lighter, “with nicer hair and a fuller figure.” Maggie looks at Dee with “envy and awe.” Maggie feels that life has always been easier for Dee than for her.

How does Maggie feel about Dee’s request for the quilts?

Her desire to hang the quilts, in a museumlike exhibit, suggests that she feels reverence for them but that to her they are essentially foreign, impersonal objects. Mama understands that Maggie, not Dee, should have the quilts, because Maggie will respect them by using them in the way they were intended to be used.

Why does Dee want the churn and quilts Why does Maggie want them explain in at least two different ways the meaning and significance of the title?

In Alice Walker’s “Everyday Use,” Dee wants the quilts simply because they would make attractive accents to her new home and her new life, not because they have significance having been sewn by hand by women who came before her, worked hard, suffered and built a life for themselves.

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How does Maggie first react when Dee wants the quilts?

When Maggie thinks of the quilts, she remembers how she was taught to make them and uses them because she believes that that is what her grandma would want her to do. … Dee condescendingly says that Maggie “can’t appreciate” the quilts. Dee fears Maggie will use them every day.